Broadford Memorial Park - Fromelles mural

Consultation has concluded

A mosaic commemorating the Fromelles Battle featuring red poppies, blue cornflours, beige outline of soldiers and a black backdrop of the battleground along with a woman praying and orange explosions in the sky.

The Broadford RSL is proposing a mosaic art mural at the Broadford Memorial Park.

The proposed mural has two sides. One side commemorates the Fromelles Battle in the First World War. The other side commemorates the present day efforts to identify the missing soldiers buried there.

While this is an RSL project, it is on public land managed by Council. The land is located near other public facilities including a playground, toilets and a bushfire memorial.

Council is therefore seeking community input on the proposed designs and location. Survey closes 9 September and a drop in session will be held on site on 26 August.

Depending on the response to community consultation, the project will either:

  • proceed to final approval
  • or further discussions with the Broadford RSL will occur to change the artwork or location that is agreeable to all parties.

The mural will be subject to final approval by Council.

Funding partners

The project is funded by the Broadford RSL and supported by the Victorian Government and the Victorian Veterans Council through the Victoria Remembers grants. Mitchell Shire Council is providing in-kind support.

The Broadford RSL is proposing a mosaic art mural at the Broadford Memorial Park.

The proposed mural has two sides. One side commemorates the Fromelles Battle in the First World War. The other side commemorates the present day efforts to identify the missing soldiers buried there.

While this is an RSL project, it is on public land managed by Council. The land is located near other public facilities including a playground, toilets and a bushfire memorial.

Council is therefore seeking community input on the proposed designs and location. Survey closes 9 September and a drop in session will be held on site on 26 August.

Depending on the response to community consultation, the project will either:

  • proceed to final approval
  • or further discussions with the Broadford RSL will occur to change the artwork or location that is agreeable to all parties.

The mural will be subject to final approval by Council.

Funding partners

The project is funded by the Broadford RSL and supported by the Victorian Government and the Victorian Veterans Council through the Victoria Remembers grants. Mitchell Shire Council is providing in-kind support.

Consultation has concluded
  • About the location

    4 months ago

    The mosaic mural is proposed to be installed at Memorial Park in Broadford.

    The location of the mural has been selected to complement the existing War Memorial space.

    This is a prominent location in Broadford with nearby residents and businesses and a high volume of passing traffic.

    The park is well used by people of all ages including children and young people. The park also includes a number of other public use areas including a playground, open space, a toilet block, memorial space and a Bushfire Memorial garden.

    The mosaic mural is proposed to be installed at Memorial Park in Broadford.

    The location of the mural has been selected to complement the existing War Memorial space.

    This is a prominent location in Broadford with nearby residents and businesses and a high volume of passing traffic.

    The park is well used by people of all ages including children and young people. The park also includes a number of other public use areas including a playground, open space, a toilet block, memorial space and a Bushfire Memorial garden.

  • Artist synopsis

    4 months ago

    Artist Donna Meyer

    Synopses of images - Fromelles Memorial Mural

    My aim was to design symbolic imagery to represent historical fact and evoke emotional response. During a research trip to Fromelles, France, I worked there with the local school children who assisted with the design process. In conclusion, the next generation of Fromelles citizens wished to see images of Australian soldiers, broken buildings and poppies and cornflowers.

    Side one will commemorate the battle, and side two will commemorate the exhumation of the mass graves discovered in 2008 which resulted in the DNA matching of 250 missing Australian soldiers.

    Both mosaics contain images of the Fromelles church. Churches are a common landmark in the North of France and you will find one in every village. The terrain of the Western Front is so flat, that you can see the churches outstretched for miles ahead and you can always make your way to the next village because of this.

    Artist Donna Meyer

    Synopses of images - Fromelles Memorial Mural

    My aim was to design symbolic imagery to represent historical fact and evoke emotional response. During a research trip to Fromelles, France, I worked there with the local school children who assisted with the design process. In conclusion, the next generation of Fromelles citizens wished to see images of Australian soldiers, broken buildings and poppies and cornflowers.

    Side one will commemorate the battle, and side two will commemorate the exhumation of the mass graves discovered in 2008 which resulted in the DNA matching of 250 missing Australian soldiers.

    Both mosaics contain images of the Fromelles church. Churches are a common landmark in the North of France and you will find one in every village. The terrain of the Western Front is so flat, that you can see the churches outstretched for miles ahead and you can always make your way to the next village because of this.

  • Mosaic 1. The Battle

    4 months ago
    The battle

    The praying woman, symbolises all the hearts 'back home' and the effect on the community, particularly the women. The notion of praying is one that many people can relate to when in a dire situation of helplessness.

    The rising sun symbolises the First World War and represents a new dawn.

    The Cornflowers are the French equivalent to the Poppy. Both flowers growing together creates a unity between France and Australia.



    The praying woman, symbolises all the hearts 'back home' and the effect on the community, particularly the women. The notion of praying is one that many people can relate to when in a dire situation of helplessness.

    The rising sun symbolises the First World War and represents a new dawn.

    The Cornflowers are the French equivalent to the Poppy. Both flowers growing together creates a unity between France and Australia.



  • Mosaic 2. The Battle Aftermath

    4 months ago
    The battle aftermath

    Artist Synopsis

    The graveyard in this image, is historically significant as it is the only Commonwealth military graveyard to be built since the Second World War. This was a direct result of the discovery, of so many missing soldiers.

    The DNA strand represents the only large-scale DNA testing, committed by the Commonwealth. Thousands of female Australians have given samples of their DNA so that, to date, 250 missing Australian soldiers have been identified.

    The boxes of colour next to the graves are Colour Patches. During the First World War each brigade and battalion wore a different colour patch for identification. Incorporating the colour patches into the design, ensures that every single man involved in the Battle of Fromelles is included. This, of course, without listing each individual name.

    The 'spirit soldiers' hopefully speak for themselves. The soldier in the sky looking down upon the graveyard is a portrait of 'Pompey Elliot,' who was without doubt, one of the most loved officers in the AIF.

    Some see another generic soldier. Others recognise the portrait as Pompey Elliot overlooking his men.

    Please note that the choice of natural stone for the tesserae of the mosaics can be limited in availability of hues, therefore the colours of the final artworks may vary to the designs. The designs may also need to be 'tweaked' here and there for better results, but will essentially remain the same.



    Artist Synopsis

    The graveyard in this image, is historically significant as it is the only Commonwealth military graveyard to be built since the Second World War. This was a direct result of the discovery, of so many missing soldiers.

    The DNA strand represents the only large-scale DNA testing, committed by the Commonwealth. Thousands of female Australians have given samples of their DNA so that, to date, 250 missing Australian soldiers have been identified.

    The boxes of colour next to the graves are Colour Patches. During the First World War each brigade and battalion wore a different colour patch for identification. Incorporating the colour patches into the design, ensures that every single man involved in the Battle of Fromelles is included. This, of course, without listing each individual name.

    The 'spirit soldiers' hopefully speak for themselves. The soldier in the sky looking down upon the graveyard is a portrait of 'Pompey Elliot,' who was without doubt, one of the most loved officers in the AIF.

    Some see another generic soldier. Others recognise the portrait as Pompey Elliot overlooking his men.

    Please note that the choice of natural stone for the tesserae of the mosaics can be limited in availability of hues, therefore the colours of the final artworks may vary to the designs. The designs may also need to be 'tweaked' here and there for better results, but will essentially remain the same.



  • About the Battle of Fromelles

    4 months ago

    The Battle of Fromelles occurred on the Western Front during the First World War.

    More than 5500 Australian soldiers from the 5th Australian Division died in 24 hours during the battle. It is believed to be the greatest loss by a single division in 24 hours during the First World War.

    You can learn more about The Battle of Fromelles at the Australian War Memorial website.


    The Battle of Fromelles occurred on the Western Front during the First World War.

    More than 5500 Australian soldiers from the 5th Australian Division died in 24 hours during the battle. It is believed to be the greatest loss by a single division in 24 hours during the First World War.

    You can learn more about The Battle of Fromelles at the Australian War Memorial website.